Fiadone, A Corsican Dessert & A Giveaway

Tuesday, November 02, 2010

Fiadone

I realize that I never posted a recap of my BlogHer Food experience and although work being the primary reason, well...I really don't have another reason. Many bloggers were doing such a good job at putting into words all the feelings experienced during that weekend that I commented on theirs instead of writing mine. I did go to BlogHer Food with some goals such as deliberately meeting some folks to see if my first online impressions matched my second in real life ones but also to let the unexpected guide me to meet new faces or take part in amazing conversations.

That's how I met Michael (deliciously devilish), and Stephen (super talented photog), told Aida Mollenkamp I digged her shoes of all things, had an Oprah moment in the conference hotel bathroom with Tami and Jeanne and finally crushed hard on this little firecracker of a woman, Georgia Pelligrini. And I also digged her boots. No I don't have a foot fetish, I just have major crushes on strong women, marrying beauty and fearlessness.

Simple Pleasures

Georgia could be a model. Instead she roams the world to discover "culinary artisans across the world, who are fighting to preserve their food traditions." She compiled 16 of them into a book "Food Heroes" that came out this past September. Listening to Georgia's enthusiasm about the people in each story was like drinking moonshine. It's sweet, powerful and it burns your eyes it's so good. I promised myself to order a copy as soon as I got home. Georgia beat me to it and sent me one with a little note telling me to check the chapters on the two artisans in France.

For the next 30 minutes I was in another world. It's one thing to tell the story of someone. It's another thing to tell someone's story. Georgia knows how to do just that. In no time I was back on the hills of my childhood, running among the olive trees and picking fresh figs to eat on the way back from school. I wanted to read about all the other people in her book and without realizing it, night had fallen while I was deep into the story of Bill Best, the seed librarian in Berea, Kentucky.

Fiadone

There's something comforting for an historian like me to know that some people make a life out of preserving food traditions. As Ruhlman said during the conference, "food is our humanity" and these people are our humanity keepers. Keeping traditions alive is a testament of our ability to understand passion for quality and care. I see that every Saturday morning when I go to the farmers market in downtown Charleston. We have genuine artisans among them, people with the skills of working their product in an ethical and organic fashion. To pass their passions and a bit of their story on to us everytime we go and take the time to chat for a couple of minutes.

It's a special treat to see these farmers' eyes light up with every question I ask or when I tell them what I cooked or baked with the produce or meats I got the week before. There is an exchange far beyond that of goods and paper bills. There is humanity. I always feel a little closer to that when I can buy a product in its raw form and turn it into something else, simply by applying the teachings of other artisans I met when I worked in restaurant kitchens. Food artisans and food lovers would be miserable without one another.

Last Four

I was really excited to get the first delivery of fresh goat's milk of the morning the other day at the market. I bought more than two people would consume in one week and I know the people at Joseph Fields Farm thought I was a bit strange. I had a plan. I had been craving faisselle, a soft large curd cheese I grew up eating and wanted to make a few batches with goat's milk for a change. I think if I were to become an artisan, I would raise goats and make cheese. I am serious.

I made so much faisselle that I quickly had to think about ways to use it. I love it barely drained from its whey with a bit of honey and a sprinkle of walnuts in the Winter. In the Summer, I like to mash up so raspberries and sugar along with it. In the Fall? Well...I had never thought about that one. Yet. Until one of our friend mentioned that his work stint was over with here and he was moving back to his native Corsica. I told him to come over for dinner and I would make Fiadone with the fresh faisselle I had just made.

Draining Goat Cheese Faisselle

I have spent very little time in Corsica but it was enough to fall in love with its people, its landscape, its energy and its food. One thing I loved almost as immediately as it hit my lips was the Corsican dessert Fiadone. It's really a cross between a flan and a cheesecake and usually made with brocciu, or brousse, a slightly curdles soft cheese made from cows or goats. All I had to do was make the faisselle, drain it as I would fresh cheese and we were in business.

I know not everyone has access to fresh goats milk to make faisselle for this dessert and the good news is that you can substitute ricotta or well drained yogurt in the same proportion. It is light and refreshing and you can really boost up the flavors anyway you want. We like it with loads of lemon zest but orange or freshly cut pear slices on top would be perfect for the season. Hope you give it a try!

Food Heroes

In the spirit of celebrating food crafters and food artisans all over, Georgia is graciously offering two copies of her book to two lucky readers. I dare say lucky because you will want to get on a road trip and visit them all after reading this book! All you have to do to win one of two copies of Food Heroes by Georgia Pellegrini is to leave a comment on this post between today Tuesday November 2nd and Sunday November 7th. One entry per person, no anonymous. That's it...

I monitor comments manually and I am going out of town for the rest of the week so if you don't see your comment right away, give me at least 48 hrs before emailing me about it.

Where am I going? I am heading to Indiana to photograph Caitlin's, from Engineer Baker, wedding. It's my wedding present to her and J and after our engagement session here this summer, I could not be more excited. I took the week to be with them and give her some bridal shots, document the making of the wedding cakes (yes....she's doing her own wedding cakes), the rehearsal dinner and of course the ceremony. Those lovebirds are so adorable together...I will try my best to post snapshots!

Fiadone


Fiadone, adapted from "Fromages Frais Maison" by Cathy Ytak

Serves 6-9

1/2 cup sugar
3 eggs
zest of one lemon
1 tablespoon cornstarch
pinch of salt
1 cup drained faisselle or ricotta cheese

Line an 8x8-inch sqaure pan with parchment paper, butter lightly and set aside.
Preheat the oven to 375F and position a rack in the middle.
In a large bowl, whisk together the sugar and the eggs until pale. Add the lemon zest, cornstarch and salt and whisk until blended. Add the drained cheese and whisk well.
Pour into your prepared pan, place into the oven and lower the heat to 350F. Bake for 45 minutes. The cake does not rise, it gets dark around the edges and a knife inserted in the middle should come out clean. Let cool for a few minutes before sharing.

To make faisselle without the traditional molds (what I do at home):

Heat up 4 cups of raw milk or whole milk (cow or goat) and 1 cup of Greek yogurt (full fat) into a large saucepan until the mixture reaches 30C.
In the meantime, place 6 drops of rennet (found at healthfood stores) in the bottom of a large, super clean, bowl.
Once the milk mixture has reached proper temperature, slowly pour it into the bowl with the rennet. Give one turn with a wooden spoon and let sit.
Do not move your bowl or stir again. Leave it alone for a least 6 hours. Very carefully transfer to the fridge. Try not to shake and move the bowl too much to prevent the curds from breaking lose before they are ready.
After another 4-6 hours, the faisselle is ready to be broken into and to be drained to the consistency that you prefer.

310 comments:

«Oldest   ‹Older   201 – 310 of 310   Newer›   Newest»
Meagan said...

This recipe looks delicious and I love reading your blog! Thanks so much for the opportunity to win a copy of this book!!

Linda Hartlaub said...

This book sounds wonderful. I would love to win a copy.

Lostgirl said...

I just discovered her via Ree's Tasty Kitchen. She is amazing, and I would love her book!

Elaine said...

Traditions are meant to be preserved!

tlo7 said...

Can't wait to make the Fiadone with some homemade cheese! Thanks for the beautiful blog and inspiring pictures.

Kelly Edm said...

What a wonderful giveaway. I'd love to win!

Karla said...

This book sounds wonderful. I would love to read it. I also want to thank you for writing such beautiful posts, I have enjoyed both your stories and your recipes.

Brenda and James Fisher said...

What a lovely look, I hope I win!

needlesandbread said...

I love reading about food and the people who make it. It's so inspiring to know that there are people out there who care deeply about food and it's traditions.

I will also have to make this fiadone... A combination of flan and cheesecake? How can I resist that?

Sara said...

Mmmm lemon zest and faisselle! The book looks fabulous too!

natwhat said...

Yum! These look delicious.

I would love to win this book! :) Thanks for the giveaway!

Beverly Lynn said...

Mmmmmm, that looks really good. I may have to pick up some ricotta cheese on my way home.

alice t. said...

i love the idea of preserving traditions. what a wonderful read.

thanks!

Kepa said...

This looks exactly like my type of book. Can't wait to read it.

Gen said...

Ah oui ça c'est un dessert traditionnel! Et pourtant je n'en ai jamais goputé! Il a l'air très appétissant, est ce difficile de trouver de la faisselle outre Atlantique?

Whitney said...

Omg! I live in Charleston, Sc too! I though this city was absent of this type of flare! I'm so happy I found you! I came across your blog through Bakerella. I am having my 25th birthday soon and I am totally making your Macaroon pops. I can't wait to tell all my baking enthusiasts about you! I actually just wrote about this in my blog.
http://glitteratielite.wordpress.com/2010/11/04/party-planning-cake-pops/
All I have ever wanted to do was be a food stylist, but I don't know how to go about it and I almost thought it was next to impossible in Charleston. Glad to know it's not! Let me know if you want and intern ;)

lindsay said...

You are so talented, and I know if you recommend something, like this amazing book, it is going to be fabulous! Thank you for all the inspiration you bring me - your blog is my favorite!

Margaret said...

Another amazing post with gorgeous pictures. If I can get my hands on some raw milk...I may just give this a whirl!

Pamela Keener said...

Thanks for the giveaway. I would love to win this book.
Love & Hugs,
Pam

pinky-yin said...

love your blog .. and book looks interesting. fingers crossed :P

Trinity said...

I can't wait to get in my kitchen and make these. And they book sounds amazing. Thanks for posting such beautiful things!

Dani said...

hope everything goes well with the wedding :)

dani@sweettreatsdani.com

Gina said...

I just recently started visiting your blog and love it. I first heard about it in an article from the local newspaper about macaron. Which picked my curiosity.

marla@familyfreshcooking.com said...

Oh, this recipe looks wonderful. We have been enjoying ricotta in everything these days. From sweets to savories, it is so adaptable. The goat milks cheese sounds like it would be even better.
Such nice stories you share here. I too was sent Georgia's book & am mesmerized by her & her life's journey. That gal is breath taking in every way. I look forward to reading more of her book in the next few weeks.
xo

Alexandra said...

Thanks to my foodie son, I have rediscovered the beauty of goat cheese....the photos are gorgeous, helene!
Best wishes on your travels!

chroniclesofasingleton said...

Your pictures are always so beautiful. I've read the reviews for the book and I think its wonderful how the author has weaved all these food traditions and people's lives into a beautiful biography. Love the title too.

Terri. said...

Great giveaway! I would love this book.

tshaw6580@yahoo.com

Laura Evrard said...

Ooo! I love books!

Amanda said...

Thanks so much for having a give away! I hope you have fun photographing your friend's wedding!

alyssa said...

oh how wonderful! this is so nice!

Erica said...

I'm eager to try this with goat yogurt. Thanks for the recipe, and what a Beautiful book cover! I agree - sharing food is about sharing love, care, and a general sense of humanity.

cajoline said...

I'm French my english language is not verry perfect ! but i can say that your recette is beautifull and I always enjoy seeing your pictures ! have a good day
caroline

Shelby said...

Another outstanding, mouthwatering and ever inspiring post! As a food lover and growing artisan myself, I would be delighted to indulge in a copy of Pellegrini's 'Food Heroes'. I too believe that carrying on tradition is the essence of proper progression, and what better a way to do this than with food? Thank you for the suggestion!

Fragolina said...

The book sounds lovely and instructive. Your pictures are sooo beautiful!!!

Jenn said...

Ooh that looks so yummy!! Hope you have a wonderful week at the wedding!

amherstrose said...

My wonderful Mom was my Food Hero.
She taught me such wonderful things about local food and how to preserve and cook with it.

Reading this post reminded me of her canned peaches and tomato sauce which were such wonderful treats during the cold Ohio Winters.

Thanks for bringing this book to our attention.

Mary Jane

Marie (Food Nouveau) said...

Georgia's book seems deeply interesting. I would have loved to hear her talk about her experiences! Traveling around the world, I find that food artisans are too often in a "fighting to stay alive" position. Yes there is this movement to go back to our roots, but the reality is, on a day-to-day basis, most people forego their farmers' market (if they have one close to home) to go to the one-stop-shop grocery store. Farmers are such passionate people, they have so much to teach about where our food comes from, a concept that's still foreign to our urbanized youth. More knowledge means better choices - I grew up in a city, far from agriculture, and now I try to catch up as I travel to get to know more about the people who are still working their butts off to bring us fresh foods, everyday. I find it so important to help these people get a voice to shed a light on their crucial role. A book like Georgia's is essential; I can't wait to get my hands on it. If I don't win it through your blog, I'll buy it for sure! Maybe it'll help decide of what will be my next travel destination :)

Charlotte said...

Sounds delicious! And the book would be an amazing addition to the library! Thank you.

Linda said...

First of all I want to tell you that I really appreciate your site! The recipes and photos bring back a little bit of France each time I have a visit :)

And I hope to be choosen for the book, it really sounds interesting and the cover looks also so good :)

Lindsey @ Hot Polka Dot said...

Wonderful giveaway! I am so in!

lifesapprentice said...

I love love LOVE Georgia, and I love your blog. This book would be such an addition to my current food obsession.


:)

Mauryn said...

Thank you! I'm very intrigued. That book sounds wonderful and Georgia's website is great too! Her boots are slammin'.

Jen said...

I've made mozzarella but not faisselle - though I think I have a new plan for this weekend! I've never made anything with goat's milk either, though perhaps this is this perfect time to try.

Meagan said...

Wonderful post - I love reading your blog! Thanks for the giveaway opportunity!!

margie stroman said...

I would love to read the book! Reading about food is almost as good as eating it . . .

Q. said...

Pick me! Pick me! Thank you for the giveaways! Lovely of you.

sprite said...

Sounds delicious! Please enter me into the giveaway for the book.

Joan said...

Welcome to Indiana! The sun is shining bright here today. Enjoy reading your blog and hope to try out more recipes soon! Thanks.

wren said...

such an inspiring collection of women who make happen for themselves such tender beautiful things. So admirable to be surrounded by this energy! Thanks for the opportunity!

Kari said...

The book sounds wonderful. And your pics as always, perfect.

Brian Wakefield said...

I absolutely love your work!

Brian

Kathy said...

Enjoy your blog so much and your desserts are always beautiful…I still want to attempt your macaroons.

Human Potpourri said...

I would love that book! As always good food, good photos!

Rocky Mountain Woman said...

I guess if I don't win the book, I can always order one from Amazon..

Thank you for the sweet giveaway!

mrsshukra said...

Thanks for sharing this book with us, great post!

momgateway said...

Thanks for the chance to win this beautiful book!

Sophie said...

Looks delicious!

jkoplin said...

People and their food stories -- what better combination? Fiadone is new to me, and it looks so easy and delicious that I have no choice but to make it directly! Have a wonderful trip . . .

Alanna said...

I'm picturing myself snuggled up on the couch with this book in one hand, your fiadone in the other, and a glass of wine nearby. Yum!

faraway girl said...

I share the exact same feeling as you when it comes to fresh produce right from the farmer's backyard! And the book sounds like a really intriguing read!

Love said...

I'm a passionate traveler who picks my next destination primarily on the food... I would devour this in a second! :)

pinky black said...

Bon Voyage! thank you for sharing a wonderful recipe before you leave. i love fiadones with yogurt. it is so light. i'd love to try making this with my niece.

CrazyVet said...

That book looks fascinating. I miss the advanture of finding people like that, like I could when I lived in Spain. Where I live now there's not much of a tradition to maintain as agriculture and food production are so modernized, that whatever little tradition has a very difficult time confronting with these forces.

Issie said...

Preserving age old traditions is truly an art in itself, thus we must do our best to keep old recipes and techniques alive.
For every food, every recipe, there is story.
Many thanks to the people who continue to tell these stories for the enjoyment of the world.

Topher said...

Thanks for the giveaway.

Looks delicious.

Chris

zekks at yahoo dot com

L.Q. said...

As always, your photographs look gorgeous and the food makes me want to eat it up right out of the screen! Here's to good luck on the giveaway...

Gaia said...

This book sounds great! I love your post: Fiadone is a sweet, childhood memory for me from when I used to spend summer holidays in Corsica as a kid. Thanks for making me remember it!

Meadow said...

I love reading and trying out new cookbooks, and would enjoy this one too!

June said...

Cookbooks are so interesting to learn from!
Enjoy the wedding!

Jen H said...

I love being transported by a book, especially when it involves food. I remember so many of my experiences with the food surrounding them. Thank you for this amazing giveaway. I loved reading the post.

BakinSugar@aol.com

uuuu said...

uuu

mellowmellowmarshmellow said...

As usual, such a deliciously looking recipe!

Annapurna said...

Your blog is so lovely!! I am mesmerized by the photos and the way you write about food. I am glad this book was written. I would love to read it!

Leah said...

You always style your food so well. What beautiful dessert:) I've got my fingers crossed on that book! I'll definitely check it out, even if I don't win:)

Kendall said...

Oooooh this book sounds awesome. <333 I love your blog so much.

Rebecca said...

What a wonderful sounding book, and what beautiful pictures you take. I just found your blog and I am loving it!

keri wong said...

your dessert, which looks AMAZING, looks just like a dessert we have in hawaii called butter mochi. i can't describe the texture, but it's so good!

Alyson said...

I love this post. I don't know that my cooking will ever achieve artisanal status, but I enjoy the though of working my way there (slowly)!

Dru said...

Looks really really good. thanks for the giveaway.

Elleadit said...

I made the mistake of looking at your blog during my 12-hour studying-and-not-eating stint in the library and basically salivated instantly. I'm going to try this as soon as I can!

Gypsy Eyes Jewelry said...

Thank You! Thank You! Thank You!
Your recipes, photos and tales never fail to transport me on magical sensory journeys.

rora said...

The fiadone sounds delicious and yet quite simple!

God bless,
Laura.

Amelia PS said...

"food is our humanity"...what an amazing statement. I write, photograph, prepare, share and reminisce about food (and all the people associated with it) and this sentence summarizes that incredible sense of history that I feel every time I make a dish, especially ones with a past.
Everything about this post is lovely. The "introduction" to new (to me) bloggers, Giada's story (I would love to read the story of the olive farmer, the buter poet, the persimmom masseuse, the fig collector and all the other characters), the making of faisselle first and then its metamorphosis into the fiadone, the lacy delicate cheesecloth enwrapping its tender bite, the airy light feel of a mid-fall walk in a country side small village I got from your photographs, and last but not least your seemingly effortless writing.
I started my blog partially inspired by yours. Thank you!!!

Victoria said...

Sounds like a wonderful read. I'll add it to my wish list regardless. Thank you for sharing.

theartfulgardener said...

I hope it is not too late to comment.

Dani said...

looks yummy!

rumana said...

hiya..if u are to praise a book so much im thinkin its gotta b a winner..lets hope i am too(fingers crossed)

colleenfraser5 said...

Pick me! Food and literature are my two greatest past-times!

annapurna said...

I really enjoy reading about your blog and am very intrigued by Georgia's book.

Douceur ♥ said...

The possibility to win this perfect book is amazing!

Becky said...

What a wonderful post! Thanks so much!

Maria said...

so exciting !

Kristin said...

Oh that book looks so fabulous!!! (and of course your photos always look great!)

Heidi - Apples Under My Bed said...

A lovely read, thank you. It made me all warm & fuzzy reading about the beauty of true artisans. A lovely recipe. I think you should buy that goat and make cheese :)
Heidi xo

Lisa said...

What a delicious looking dessert and a great giveaway.

Katie B said...

The book looks really interesting. Another I hope to add to my collection

Ilke said...

The book sounds really interesting. It is amazing how much we lose from who we are and where we come from for the sake of convenience!

Rene said...

Fiadone is remembered by my Italian-American fellow as "jildoan" and I've had a difficult time finding the recipe! Just in time for his birthday, too!

Erin Wilson said...

Ditto on raising goats and making cheese! That sounds like the perfect life, especially if living in Corsica.

I'd love to win this book!

Julea Ivancovich Photography said...

I LOVE your blog! I am a "foody" to the core! I think food is art and that you are an artist already! I would be ecstatic if I won this book! I know I am coming in at the tail end of this contest, but it is still Sunday right!?!?! :) Thank you for all your hard work!!!

Kalee said...

That fiadone looks to die for delicious!

fabuleuxdestinbrenna said...

oh No! i missed the deadline for the giveaway :( Looks like an amazing read though !

Brenda @ a farmgirl's dabbles said...

I realize I'm too late on the book give away, but just wanted to say how intriguing I've found Georgia to be also. Just discovered her and her book recently, and I'm loving her take on life. I used to hunt with my dad and am enjoying her excursions. AND, your Fiadone looks scrumptious!!

Emma Slipp said...

The book sounds wonderful. Even if I don't win I will be buying a copy!

Cami said...

The book looks very interesting! I´m excited to try the fiadone also. thanks

Cathy @ ShowFoodChef said...

I waited til after the contest to comment because I already have Georgia's book and agree - SO wonderful. I was so moved by your own words on food and artisans, too and I'm fascinated by Faiselle, which I had not heard of. I love making ricotta and mascarpone - so can't wait to learn more about this one. Your recipe is on my MUST do and I know they will turn out perfectly because your recipes always do. You added sunshine to a rainy morning in LA, today. :D

K said...

I've never had Fiadone before, but it looks so good in your photos! The thought of making my own cheese is a little itimidating, but your instructions make it seem a lot easier...maybe I'll try it when I have some free time on my hands.

I would love a copy of the book. It sounds like a great read!

hawkbrwn said...

I love your photo in this post of the eggs. It's lovely. I read your blog regularly. Thank you for the pleasant and interesting reads here.

The book looks like a treat too. Thank you for offering the giveaway.

Ali said...

ohh this post excites me so much!
I was on holidays in France a couple of months ago and my MIL got me to try this but i had no idea what was called - will definitely be making this!

MikeWas said...

I'd love to read this book!

The farmers, fishers & gatherers that put food on our table are unappreciated in the US. Our food goes through factories before we get it.

EVERYBODY should read this book!

«Oldest ‹Older   201 – 310 of 310   Newer› Newest»

Tartelette All rights reserved © Blog Milk - Powered by Blogger