Skip to main content

9 Health Benefits of Lavender Tea & 7 Tips

Lavender has been a well-loved, even revered plant since Ancient Egyptian times. It’s long been used to make fragrances and to add a soothing quality to rituals. Here you’ll find all of the health benefits of lavender tea.

To this day, people employ lavender tea to sleep better, de-stress, ease anxiety, and even ease pain. Lavender is easy to grow and use from your own garden, too.

But did you know that there are many more benefits to drinking lavender tea? And did you know that there are several varieties of lavender available for different uses?

In this article we’ll explore the many benefits of lavender tea, any potential risks, and how you can best make this fragrant, purple-hued beverage at home.

What Lavender Tea Is: Interesting Facts

What Lavender Tea Is: Interesting Facts

Lavender tea is most commonly made using the flowering buds of the Lavandula Angustifolia plant, which is cultivated as the culinary form of lavender.

Fun fact: there are approximately 100 sub-species of Lavandula Angustifolia, all of which are edible.

English Hidcote is great, and much loved for its dark purple flowers and exquisite fragrance. Munstead lavender is another lovely, lighter-colored subtype.

Many of the other lavender plant species have a higher camphor content, and are therefore not really suitable as this can irritate the throat and nose. The inedible subtypes you’ll want to avoid include Lavandula Stoechas, Lavandula X Intermedia, and Lavandula Latifolia.

Most lavender teas or tisanes are made with just loose, dried lavender buds. Some are made of blends including other relaxing ingredients such as chamomile or lemon balm, or have added zesty flavors like dried orange peel.

Origin and Where Lavender Tea Comes From

Origin and Where Lavender Tea Comes From

Lavender plants originated somewhere in the Mediterranean, Middle East, and as far as India. Its many health benefits were first discovered around 2500 years ago, when the Ancient Egyptians discovered how good it was at helping soothe certain ailments.

What Lavender Tea Is Made Of

beautiful close up shot of lavender flowers at the field

Lavender tea is made of the dried flower buds of the Lavandula Angustifolia plants.

If you have Lavandula Angustifolia in your garden, you may also use the cleaned flowers directly in tea, as you would peppermint or fresh chamomile.

The one downside to dried lavender tea: it may lose its fragrance within just a few months, so its shelf life is shorter than that of some other teas.

What Lavender Tea Tastes Like

What Lavender Tea Tastes Like

Lavender tea tends to taste more or less as it smells. It’s a little reminiscent of mint or rosemary to some, but does have a unique floral flavor that’s very relaxing.

On its own, lavender may be quite a strong flavor for some, so you may wish to adjust how long you steep it (3-10 minutes is recommended), or add some milk and/or honey to diffuse the taste slightly.

Nutritional Facts and Calories of Lavender Tea

Lavender is caffeine free and, on its own, naturally has very limited calories. It’s full of magnesium, calcium, vitamin A, iron, and vitamin C, and offers plentiful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.

Health Benefits of Lavender Tea: What It Is Good For

Health Benefits of Lavender Tea: What It Is Good For

This magical purple-hued tea is great for a number of ailments — even the Ancient Egyptians knew this. It doesn’t just smell and look great, it’s also very good for you. Below are some of the most common ways lavender tea is used to promote better health.

Promotes Better Sleep and a Calm Mind

Promotes Better Sleep and a Calm Mind

Lavender tea has long been used as a sleep aid. Both the scent and flavor appear to promote a more restful night’s sleep. It’s also generally relaxing. Even the smell of lavender can make you feel a lot more at ease and less anxious.

Supports Your Digestive System

Supports Your Digestive System

This beautifully-scented tea is said to help with indigestion and bloating. Some studies have even suggested that lavender in tea form may reduce abdominal swelling, upset stomachs, nausea, vomiting, and gas.

May Ease Period Pains

Lavender tea may help ease menstrual cramps. This seems to be largely due to the scent of the tea. Lavender oil in aromatherapy has been shown in a 2012 study to reduce discomfort and pain associated with your period.

Promotes the Better Healing of Wounds

Promotes the Better Healing of Wounds

This particular benefit is more about lavender oil rather than the tea, but it’s still an excellent benefit: the essential oil, applied topically to wounds, has been shown to accelerate the healing of wounds.

The tea, on the other hand, will promote relaxation and ease your pains naturally by making you feel less tense. A compress using freshly brewed lavender tea may also help with smaller scrapes and bruises.

Protects Your Skin from Nasty Fungal Infections

Lavender tea has antifungal as well as antibacterial effects. The oil is obviously even more potent, and may be used to treat ringworm, yeast, and athlete’s foot. It would make sense to try a lavender tea-based lukewarm bath for milder infections and see if it soothes symptoms.

May Help Balance the Immune System

May Help Balance the Immune System

This amazing tea is chock-full of anti-inflammatory properties and antioxidants.

As such, it may help balance and boost your immune system. One study on mice suggested that inhaling lavender oil helped reduce inflammation.

As such, a warm cup of lavender tea may just soothe you inside and out.

Aids Better, More Relaxed Breathing

Aids Better, More Relaxed Breathing

Inhaling the scent of lavender is known to help open up your airways. The smell of this beautiful tea may make you feel more comfortable, helping you to breathe better.

Lavender tea’s anti-inflammatory properties may also help soothe inflammation in your chest and throat, making your breathing more relaxed and easier.

May Balance Blood Sugar Levels

May Balance Blood Sugar Levels

Animal experiments have shown that lavender may help calm high blood sugar levels, while also protecting against oxidative stress.

The latter is known to cause complications in people struggling with diabetes. Therefore, lavender tea may be a good supplement for diabetics. If in doubt, always speak to your doctor or a trusted healthcare professional first.

Promotes Better Skin Health

Lavender essential oil is known to help with pigmentation associated with signs of aging, sun damage, and scarring. A lavender tea facial steam bath can help open your pores, while also reducing redness, irritation, and soothing signs of skin aging.

Potential Risks

Potential Risks

As with any natural ingredient, lavender tea doesn’t only offer benefits. There are also a few potential side effects you may come across.

Lavender tea is generally safe for most people. Here is a list of a few possible adverse reactions you may come across on rare occasions.

Potential Allergen

An allergy to lavender tea is rare but not impossible. If you suffer from symptoms of chills, headache, nausea, or vomiting, you may need to stop drinking lavender tea. Lavender oil may also cause skin irritation in some.

May Cause Headaches or Upset Stomach in Some

May Cause Headaches or Upset Stomach in Some

Some people may experience headache, diarrhea, or constipation when having lavender in medicinal amounts. Drinking it as a tea or tisane is generally considered safe, however, and shouldn’t cause you any of these issues.

Is Lavender Tea in Pregnancy Good For You?

Is Lavender Tea in Pregnancy Good For You?

Lavender tea hasn’t really been studied as a health supplement for consumption during pregnancy.

While it’s frequently used for its beautiful aroma and calming, relaxing properties, nobody fully knows its effects on pregnant women and their developing babies.

For this reason, it’s not generally recommended to use lavender tea if you are expecting.

If you’d like to add lavender tea to your pregnancy diet, you may wish to speak to your midwife or doctor first to check if it’s ok for you.

As a general rule of thumb, you may wish to avoid herbal teas during your first trimester of pregnancy. In your second and third trimesters, lavender essential oil is considered one of the safer to use topical oils you can use on your skin or as a scent near you.

Therefore lavender tea may be alright to enjoy in moderation.

How to Make Lavender Tea: A Simple Guide

How to Make Lavender Tea: A Simple Guide

Lavender tea is incredibly easy and quick to make at home. You can either use dried lavender tea from a shop or your own, homegrown and un-sprayed Lavandula Angustifolia.

If you’re using fresh lavender, always make sure you know your plant and that you’ve washed it well before use.

To make the tea, boil around 8 fl oz of water. Next, place around 4 tsps of fresh or dried lavender buds into the water in a tea ball or sieve. Allow your tea to steep for 3 to 10 minutes, depending on how strong you like it.

Serve hot, and enjoy on its own or with some added honey and/or milk for a soothing nighttime beverage.

Tips for Drinking and Serving Lavender Tea

Tips for Drinking and Serving Lavender Tea

Lavender tea is excellent on its own and offers many health benefits, as noted above. However, you can also use our hacks below to make it even more delicious and comforting. Some of these recipes may even surprise you.

Combine Lavender with Soothing Chamomile

Combine Lavender with Soothing Chamomile

Chamomile tea is well known for its benefits towards hay fever, ulcers, inflammation, pain, and more.

It’s soothing and relaxing, much like lavender, and therefore makes a great addition to your lavender tea for an even more beneficial, fragrant night-time concoction.

Just steep as directed above but with dried or fresh chamomile flowers.

Make a Nighttime Beverage with Lavender, Milk, and Honey

Make a Nighttime Beverage with Lavender, Milk, and Honey

Honey is a super food with its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties. It’s so good for you, which is why people love to use it in all sorts of concoctions.

We like honey added to lavender tea alongside a splash of milk for a soothing, fragrant, and deliciously sweet nighttime drink.

Top tip: while you wouldn’t want to waste all your good ingredients, you may actually use some honey, milk, and lavender in your bathwater, too.

Honey is known as a natural exfoliant that kills germs and brightens your skin. Milk will make your skin feel soft and smooth, thanks to the presence of natural fats in it.

Use it in Delicious Desserts

Use it in Delicious Desserts

Lavender makes for an excellent dessert ingredient, too. It’s beautiful in honey possets, in lavender lemon bars, in lavender-flavored creme brulee, and more.

By far the most effective way to use honey in your sweet cooking is to let some dried or fresh buds infuse in one of the liquid ingredients.

For example, you might gently warm some milk or cream and let the lavender steep in it for 10 to 15 minutes before using it in your cooking.

Use Lavender Tea in Sauces

Use Lavender Tea in Sauces

If you’ve ever had savory sauces made with fresh rose petals, you’ll know how beautifully balancing the addition of florals can be to salty dishes.

Adding lavender can bring much the same effect, and you may use it in sweet and salty gravies and sauces.

One of the best dishes we’ve ever had is a duck breast glazed with lavender honey, with a lavender honey sauce to perfectly complement it.

Add Lavender Tea to Your Beauty Routine

Add Lavender Tea to Your Beauty Routine

Lavender water is said to hydrate and rejuvenate your skin. Make your own by brewing a basic cup of lavender tea with no added extra ingredients.

Fill into a clean, sterilized spray bottle once cooled. You can use this directly on your skin for a cooling, refreshing mist that’ll hydrate your skin.

You may also spray it onto pillows or linens for a relaxing, calming fragrance that’s all natural.

Make a Mind-Boosting Lavender Smoothie

Make a Mind-Boosting Lavender Smoothie

There’s nothing quite like a smoothie to kick-start your day. If you’re having a particularly anxious or stressful time, try a lavender smoothie to soothe your nerves.

We like one made with water, lavender tea, soy yogurt, and acai berry powder.

The addition of acai doesn’t just add a lovely berry flavor, but it’s also said to work as a natural antidepressant and offer neuro-protective functions.

Enjoy Some Lavender Lemonade

Enjoy Some Lavender Lemonade

If you like lemonade during those hot summer months, you’ll likely love this. It’s so simple as well: all you need to do is make your favorite basic syrup recipe but add in lavender tea or fresh Lavandula Angustifolia buds.

Once cooled and ready to use, add a few spoonfuls to fresh lemonade for a sweet, slightly floral boost.

The essential oils in the lavender will also calm frazzled nerves and give you a little bit of extra relaxation after a long day in the sunshine.

You might also be interested in...
0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this.
Loading...

Related Posts

Similar Articles