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10 Health Benefits of Jasmine Tea & 6 Tips for Serving

Discover the science behind jasmine tea’s health benefits and why adding it to your daily routine could be a simple yet significant step towards healthier well-being. Jasmine tea, with its delicate, soothing aroma and subtle sweetness, has captivated tea enthusiasts for centuries.

Originating from the Fujian province of China more than 1,000 years ago, this fragrant brew has found its way into teacups around the world – not only for its scent but also for its numerous health benefits.

In this article, we’ll discuss everything you need to know about jasmine tea, including jasmine tea benefits, potential side effects, and preparation techniques to get the most out of this calming drink.

What Jasmine Tea Is: Interesting Facts

What Jasmine Tea Is: Interesting Facts

Jasmine (genus: Jasminum) is a group of fragrant flowering shrubs and vines belonging to the Olive Family (Oleaceae).

With around 200 species boasting a diversity in bloom size, foliage, and growth habit, this genus unites them all with one notable trait: fragrance.

Outside its applications in perfumery, skincare, and aromatherapy, jasmine is commonly enjoyed as a warm beverage.

Jasmine tea is usually made from one of two species: Sampaguita (Jasminum sambac) or Common Jasmine (Jasminum officinale).
Sampaguita has a mellower and less sweet aroma, with citrusy and herbaceous undertones. Common Jasmine has a warmer, richer, and sweeter scent.

Origin and Where Jasmine Tea Comes From

Origin and Where Jasmine Tea Comes From

The origins of jasmine tea date back to China’s Han Dynasty (206 BC and 220 AD). However, it was only during the Ming Dynasty – almost three centuries later – that it grew in popularity.

During the Ming Dynasty, people adored anything floral. It was intricately painted on porcelain, woven into clothes, and depicted in paintings. This cultural fascination extended to tea, where jasmine stood out for its beauty and fragrance.

Fuzhou, the capital of southeastern China’s Fujian province, is hailed as the ‘City of Jasmine’ because of its long-standing tradition of cultivating and producing high-quality jasmine tea.

Fuzhou’s favorable climate and fertile soil offered the optimal conditions for growing jasmine plants, allowing them to flourish and produce fragrant blossoms.

The growth of the tea trade in the 19th and early 20th centuries further propelled the popularity of jasmine tea.

As international trade routes expanded and global demand for Chinese tea increased, jasmine tea became one of the most sought-after varieties in the foreign market.

Recognizing its booming popularity, Taiwan and Japan adopted their own jasmine tea-making techniques. Vietnam followed suit, leveraging its expertise in tea cultivation to produce jasmine tea using locally grown tea leaves.

Today, jasmine tea is enjoyed by millions around the world, not only for its delicate aroma but also for its health benefits. It’s available in various forms, from tea leaves to tea bags, and easily accessible in supermarkets, specialty tea shops, and online retailers.

What Jasmine Tea Is Made Of

What Jasmine Tea Is Made Of

Jasmine tea is made with two main ingredients: green tea leaves (typically from the Camellia sinensis plant) and jasmine flowers.

Through a careful scenting process, the fragrance of the jasmine flowers is infused into the tea leaves.

The leaves are prepared for scenting by steaming or drying them with indirect, warm air, and kept cool in storage until late summer when jasmine blossoms are ready to be harvested.

Just-bloomed jasmine flowers are mixed with the tea leaves under carefully controlled temperature and humidity, allowing the leaves to absorb the jasmine’s scent. This process takes anywhere between 24 hours to a few weeks, depending on the intended result.

Finally, the scented tea leaves are carefully dried to remove excess moisture, preserving the aroma of the jasmine flowers.

What Jasmine Tea Taste Like

Jasmine tea has a delicate floral taste. It’s somewhat reminiscent of rose and lavender, with a subtle sweetness and a fragrant aroma. The taste is often described as a soothing drink with a lingering floral aftertaste.

Does Jasmine Tea Have Caffeine?

Does Jasmine Tea Have Caffeine

Jasmine green tea contains minimal amounts of caffeine, about 25 to 90 milligrams per cup depending on the type. That’s around 75 percent less than a cup of coffee.

Conversely, jasmine tisane tea, also known as jasmine flower tea, has zero caffeine. Jasmine tisane is an herbal infusion made solely from jasmine flowers.

It has a more pronounced floral flavor than jasmine green tea and lacks the subtle bitterness that comes with it.

This makes it an excellent alternative for people looking to reduce their caffeine intake while still enjoying the delicate notes of jasmine flowers.

Here’s a table of the approximate amount of caffeine in jasmine tea, depending on the type:

Jasmine Tea TypeMilligram per Cup
Green Jasmine Tea35 to 70 mg
Black Jasmine Tea60 to 90 mg
White Jasmine Tea30 to 55 mg
Decaf Jasmine Tea0 to 2 mg

Nutritional Facts and Calories of Jasmine Tea

Nutritional Facts and Calories of Jasmine Tea

Jasmine tea is made from tea leaves and jasmine flowers infused in water, so it’s a calorie-free beverage. Brewed without milk or sugar, a cup of jasmine tea does not contain any protein, fiber, fat, sugar nor calories.

Jasmine tea contains trace amounts of micronutrients and antioxidants, including flavonoids, polyphenols, and catechins.

These compounds are associated with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and other health-promoti.ng effects.
It also has trace amounts of vitamins and minerals, such as iron, potassium, zinc, and copper.

Health Benefits of Jasmine Tea

Health Benefits of Jasmine Tea

Here are some of the most notable health benefits of jasmine tea – from benefits for the mind to side effects on your weight loss.

Relaxes the Body and Mind

Relaxes the Body and Mind

Jasmine green tea is believed to have a calming, sedative effect that soothes the body and mind.

Inhaling the aroma of jasmine while you sip can help reduce stress and anxiety, and improve your mood.

Moreover, green tea – the base for jasmine green tea – contains an amino acid called L-theanine. This amino acid promotes relaxation and improves sleep quality by increasing the alpha wave production in the brain.

Supports Weight Loss

Supports Weight Loss

Jasmine tea can help you lose weight by speeding up your metabolism and fat burning by 4 to 5 percent and 10 to 16 percent respectively, according to biologist Dr. Hursel.

This means that drinking two to three cups of jasmine tea can help you passively burn 280 to 420 calories per day.

The fat-burning properties of jasmine tea are attributed to a polyphenol flavonoid called Epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG). EGCG boosts metabolism and promotes fat oxidation.

Lowers the Risk of Cancer

Lowers the Risk of Cancer

Though further research is needed, some scientists believe that green tea leaves in jasmine tea can reduce the risk of cancer – particularly breast and prostate cancer.

Green tea extracts have demonstrated promising results in preventing tumors in various animal studies. It also slowed the progress of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (cancer of the blood and bone marrow) in human cells.

The cancer-fighting abilities of green tea are attributed to the catechin EGCG. This compound possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which protect cells from damage that can lead to cancer development.

EGCG also interferes with the growth and spread of cancer cells, inhibits angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow), and induces apoptosis (programmed cell death) in cancer cells.

Protects the Heart

Protects the Heart

The compounds found in jasmine tea, such as antioxidants and polyphenols, protect the heart by reducing inflammation and improving blood flow.

It also prevents LDL (bad) cholesterol from oxidizing, which may help protect against the development of atherosclerosis and reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

A study conducted on hamsters found that jasmine tea reduced plaque formation in the heart by up to 68 percent .

Another study discovered that people who drank three cups or more of green or black tea every day had a 36 percent reduced risk of strokes, 21 percent reduced risk of heart disease, and 19 percent reduced risk of heart attacks compared to those who drank less than one cup a day.

Improves Oral Health

Improves Oral Health

Jasmine green tea is chock full of catechins, a group of polyphenols that kill plaque-forming bacteria that cause tooth decay and cavities.

A study that looked into the antiplaque effectiveness of green tea catechin shows that catechin-based mouthwash is just as effective at reducing dental plaque as an antiseptic mouthwash.

It also doesn’t have the negative effects associated with antiseptic mouthwashes, such as staining of teeth or altered taste perception.

This suggests that, alongside regular brushing, flossing, and dental check-ups, enjoying a cup or two of jasmine green tea each day may contribute to a healthier smile and improved oral hygiene.

Protects Against Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease

Protects Against Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease

A recent 2023 study published in the National Institute on Aging found that EGCG found in jasmine green tea may play a role in preventing proteins from misfolding in the brain.

Misfolded proteins are characteristic symptoms of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. By maintaining proper folding of brain proteins, green tea can potentially reduce the risk of developing these neurological conditions.

This claim is backed by a review of 26 studies in over 52,500 people who regularly drink teas high in EGCG, like jasmine tea.

The study concluded that regular consumption of EGCG-rich teas was associated with a 35 percent lower risk of brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s.

Promotes Healthy, Glowing Skin

Promotes Healthy, Glowing Skin

Jasmine-based skin products aren’t popular just for their fragrance. Jasmine petals – the primary ingredient in most jasmine-infused skincare – are rich in antioxidants and vitamins that promote healthy skin growth and rejuvenation.

It also has deep cleansing properties that encourage the natural healing of skin. These skin-healing and glowing benefits extend to jasmine tea, as well.

The polyphenol compounds found in jasmine green tea contribute to healthy aging, according to a study led by dermatologist Dr. Patricia Oyetakin White.

They flush out free radicals that cause cell damage, contributing to healthier and brighter skin.

Improves Gut Health

Improves Gut Health

Jasmine tea possesses probiotic properties that selectively stimulate the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut.

A healthy balance of gut microbiota contributes to improved gut function, enhanced digestion, and overall better gut health.

Some studies also found that jasmine tea increased the body’s cellular antioxidants, preventing the risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Supports Better Brain Function

Jasmine tea contains just the right amount of caffeine to kick your brain activity into gear without the jitteriness or crashes associated with higher doses.

Caffeine is a natural stimulant that blocks a calming neurotransmitter called adenosine, resulting in the increased circulation of cortisol and adrenaline in the body.

It also triggers the release of feel-good neurotransmitters like dopamine and norepinephrine, which enhance the mood and improve alertness and focus.

Boosts Hair Health

Boosts Hair Health

The caffeine found in jasmine green tea has been shown to reduce frizz and produce shinier, softer, and overall healthier hair. It’s also believed to stimulate hair growth and prevent hair loss.

In one study, researchers added green tea-derived EGCG extracts directly to the scalp of three participants with alopecia. After only four days, participants experienced a noticeable increase in hair growth activity.

In another study centering hair loss in mice, 33 percent of animals who consumed green tea extract displayed hair regrowth in six months. Mice that weren’t given the extract showed no improvement in that same amount of time.

Potential Risks of Jasmine

Potential Risks of Jasmine

In moderation, jasmine tea has little to no side effects. It’s a healthy drink that benefits both physical and mental well-being. However, drinking jasmine tea in excess can lead to potential risks, including the following.

Kidney Stones

Kidney Stones

Green tea contains oxalates, a compound found in plant leaves. Oxalates can bind with calcium to form crystals. If these crystals accumulate and clump together, they can form kidney stones.

Green tea has minimal amounts of oxalates compared to other plant-based foods. Therefore, the risk of developing kidney stones from drinking jasmine tea is relatively low.

Still, people who are prone to kidney stones or have a history of kidney issues should consume jasmine green tea in moderation – no more than one to two cups a day.

Liver Damage

Liver Damage

There are more than 200 cases of liver failure associated with the over-consumption of green tea, according to a report published in the Journal of Clinical Liver Disease.

Some of these cases were so severe that they required a liver transplant.

In most of these cases, the culprit behind the liver damage was the high concentration of catechins found in green tea supplements or extracts.

While beneficial in many ways, excessively high intake of catechins overwhelms the liver’s ability to process them, leading to liver toxicity and liver failure.

Insomnia

Insomnia

Green tea contains caffeine, which can cause sleeping difficulties if consumed in excess. Therefore, green tea is best enjoyed early in the day rather than late at night.

Green tea contains less caffeine than black tea and coffee, so the risk of developing long-term insomnia due to green tea is minimal.

Interactions With Medication

As with most teas, jasmine green tea may interact with certain medications. Some of these medications include Nadolol (Corgard), Atorvastatin (Lipitor), Cimetidine (Tagamet), and Fluvoxamine (Luvox).

WebMD offers a full list of medication interactions, along with potential side effects. If you’re taking medications, look through this list or consult with your healthcare provider to ensure it’s safe for you to do so.

Is Jasmine Tea in Pregnancy Good For You?

Is Jasmine Tea in Pregnancy Good For You?

In moderation, jasmine tea is safe to drink during pregnancy. Jasmine tea contains small amounts of caffeine, so it won’t adversely affect your health as long as you drink no more than a cup or two per day.

Remember: you should limit your caffeine intake to no more than 200 milligrams per day. Anything more than that can be potentially dangerous to the developing fetus.

Drinking too much jasmine tea (and any other beverage with high caffeine content) can result in stillbirth, increased fetal heart rate, and impaired fetal oxygenation (difficulty breathing in babies), according to studies.

To reduce your caffeine intake when drinking jasmine tea, you can either brew it for a shorter period or choose white or decaf jasmine tea.

How to Make Jasmine Tea at Home: A Simple Guide

How to Make Jasmine Tea at Home: A Simple Guide

Jasmine tea follows the same preparation process as most other floral teas. Here’s how to make it at home. 

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon of loose jasmine tea (equivalent to 1 jasmine tea bag)
  • 1 cup of water
  • 1 teaspoon sweetener like sugar or honey (optional)

Instructions:

  1. Measure the amount of water you need based on how many cups of tea you want to make. For every tablespoon of jasmine loose tea, use approximately 1 cup (8 ounces) of water.
  2. Bring the water to a temperature of between 160°F to 180°F. Jasmine tea is delicate, so it’s more sensitive to high temperatures. Try not to boil the water too long. If you have it available, use a thermometer to gauge the water temperature.
  3. Pour the hot water into a mug and let the jasmine tea steep for 2 to 4 minutes, depending on your desired strength. Start steeping the tea for 2 minutes and test the flavor every 30 seconds so you can get the exact taste you prefer.
  4. If you’re using loose tea leaves, strain the tea using a container to remove the leaves.
    Add sugar, honey, or another sweetener to taste if desired. Stir until fully dissolved and enjoy.

Tips for Drinking and Serving Jasmine Tea

Tips for Drinking and Serving Jasmine Tea

Here are some tips for serving and drinking jasmine tea to make the most out of the drink.

Combine Jasmine Tea with Fresh Herbs

If you want to add an extra layer of depth to the drink jasmine tea, add in some fresh herbs during the steeping process or directly to the brewed tea as a garnish.

Herbs that go well with jasmine tea include mint, basil, rosemary, lemongrass, and lavender. Experiment with different herbs to find the balance of flavors that best suit your taste.

Add Milk

Add Milk

The floral notes of jasmine tea blend nicely with the creaminess of milk. Jasmine tea doesn’t have a strong taste, so a splash of milk is more than enough to complement the flavors.

You don’t want to add too much because the notes of the jasmine tea might become too muted.

If you like your jasmine milk tea sweet, consider adding a tablespoon or two of condensed milk instead of regular milk.

Use Filtered Water

Use filtered or spring water for brewing jasmine tea to ensure a clean and pure taste. Don’t use tap water because it may contain chlorine or other impurities, which not only affects the taste of the tea but also nullifies its nutritional benefits.

Pair With Light Foods

Pair With Light Foods

In Japan, China, Thailand, and other Asian countries, jasmine tea is served alongside light and aromatic dishes.

Consider serving jasmine tea alongside light salads, sushi, or delicate desserts like macarons and fruit tarts. The floral notes of the tea complement and enhance the flavors of these foods.

Test Other Jasmine Tea Types

Test Other Jasmine Tea Types

While shopping for jasmine tea, you’ll likely encounter multiple variations. Jasmine green tea is the classic and most popular type. It has a light, refreshing taste, and a mild floral aroma.

Jasmine white tea has a subtle sweetness and an even lighter floral note, while jasmine oolong tea offers a bolder, more complex flavor profile.

You’ll also find jasmine black tea, with a strong malty base. So if you love the taste of jasmine tea but feel like something is missing, you might want to try other varieties to see if they hit the spot.

Make Your Own

Make Your Own

In many Asian countries, jasmine tea making is considered an art form. Even today, the jasmine tea-making process of the Fujian Province is a closely guarded secret.

Still, nothing is stopping you from recreating this beloved beverage in the comfort of your kitchen.
To make jasmine tea at home, you need two ingredients: green tea leaves and jasmine flowers.

Spread them out in a single layer on clean towels in a warm, well-ventilated area, letting them dry completely. This may take several hours to several weeks, depending on your area’s humidity levels.

Once the jasmine flowers and tea leaves are fully dry, blend them together to create jasmine green tea.
Use around one teaspoon of green tea leaves and a few dried jasmine flowers per cup of tea.
Brew as instructed above.

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