Skip to main content

11 Health Benefits of Clove Tea & 4 Tips

That jar of whole cloves in your pantry packs more health benefits than you think. It can help improve bone health, relieve pain instantly, soothe sore gums, and even treat nagging toothache. But how do you get the most benefits out of cloves? Find it out in this article.

Cloves are nail-like buds that have plenty of uses in the culinary world. Like cinnamon, they’re used to add spice to some foods, and they’re steeped to make tea because of their multiple health benefits.

If you’re curious about clove tea benefits, we’ll reveal all of them below, along with some tips for making and serving the hot beverage.

What Clove Tea Is: Interesting Facts

What Clove Tea Is: Interesting Facts

You probably think you know a lot about clove, but what do you know about it other than its nail-like shape and spicy taste?

Clove is the aromatic flower bud of an evergreen tree called Syzygium aromaticum, belonging to the family Myrtaceae.

The tree has a distinctive appearance with crimson flowers growing in clusters and over-sized leaves. It’s also known for its high stature, sometimes growing up to 40 feet tall.

Contrary to the tree on which they grow, cloves are tiny-sized. They consist of a long calyx topped off by four sepals and a small central ball.

But don’t let their tiny size fool you. These nail-like buds are packed with health benefits and a load of spice.

The major component of cloves and the source of most of their health benefits is eugenol—a chemical compound that’s found in plenty of essential oils, including cinnamon and clove.

Origin and Where Clove Tea Comes From

Origin and Where Clove Tea Comes From

The clove tree originally grows in the Maluku Islands, Indonesia, and some theories say it’s native to China, particularly the Spice Islands.

However, it doesn’t matter now where it originally grew because it spread throughout plenty of countries.

Clove is now a popular spice used throughout the Middle East, Asia, and Europe. It has different harvesting seasons across many countries, which makes it available all year long.

In the culinary world, it’s used in meat rubs, sauces, marinades, and even baked goods, thanks to its warm and spicy taste. It’s also used commonly in spice blends alongside cardamom, star anise, and cinnamon.

Aside from cooking, cloves are also used in cosmetics, especially dental products like toothpaste and mouthwash. They’re also used widely in herb therapy, particularly in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine.

In our opinion, the best use for cloves yet is in clove tea. The warm drink is spicy, comforting, and packed with health benefits—everything you need in an afternoon drink.

What Clove Tea Is Made Of

What Clove Tea Is Made Of

Clove tea is made mainly of whole or ground cloves with boiling water.

It can be made in multiple different ways, but the most common way of making it is by boiling whole cloves in water, straining the cloves, and getting the tea ready for serving.

However, some people prefer adding the spicy taste of clove to the slightly nutty taste of black tea.

In this case, they make the tea by crushing the whole cloves and boiling them with tea leaves. Or, when using tea bags, they merely add whole cloves to the cup after making it.

You may or may not add sugar, depending on your taste. However, clove tea generally tastes best when sweetened with honey because it lessens the spice in its flavor.

What Clove Tea Tastes Like

What Clove Tea Tastes Like

Cloves are highly aromatic and have a spicy taste—similar to cinnamon but more peppery and spicy. They’re also slightly bitter, but they still have a sweet undertone.

Their scent can be described as medicinal, but that’s probably because it’s associated with the smell of anesthetics used by dentists.

Clove tea tastes like a blend of spicy, sweet, and bitter. It’s pretty warming, and it can taste subtly similar to cinnamon or nutmeg. If you like the taste of cinnamon, you’ll probably love clove tea because it has a similar flavor profile.

If you prefer your drinks to be more tangy, you can always squeeze some lemon juice into your cup. That’s double the health benefits.

Nutritional Facts and Calories of Clove Tea

Nutritional Facts and Calories of Clove Tea

If you’re on a weight loss diet, you don’t have to worry about the number of calories in clove tea.

Cloves are generally low-calorie, and boiling them to make tea doesn’t add any calories unless you decide to use a sweetener.

Here’s the nutritional profile of a single teaspoon of clove:

  • 6 calories
  • 1 gram fiber
  • 1 gram carbs
  • Less than 1 gram fat
  • Less than 1 gram protein
  • Less than 1 gram sugar
  • 55 percent of the daily value of manganese
  • 2 percent of the daily value of vitamin K

Health Benefits of Clove Tea

Health Benefits of Clove Tea

Cloves promise a load of health advantages, including sexual benefits, healthier bones, and relieved pain. Here’s a roundup of all the health benefits of clove tea:

Prevents Premature Ejaculation

Prevents Premature Ejaculation

Cloves have long been recognized for their ability to boost the testosterone level in men. They promote a healthier sex life by preventing premature ejaculation, but how can they do that?

The eugenol in cloves is believed to increase blood flow to the genital area, which may help with erectile dysfunction and prevent premature ejaculation.

Some studies also found that clove oil may potentially increase sperm count because of the eugenol in it, but it hasn’t been tested enough, and consuming clove oil in high concentrations can be toxic in some cases.

Hopefully, we’ll get more data about the potential for increasing sperm count in the future.

Helps With Dental Pain

Helps With Dental Pain

Though cloves have a myriad of health benefits, they’re mostly celebrated for their effects on dental health.

The eugenol found in cloves is a strong anesthetic that fights bacteria and prevents infections. On top of that, it has antiviral and anti-fungal properties.

That’s why cloves are used widely in dentistry and in making oral products like mouthwash and toothpaste.

They also have a bunch of other uses, like relieving toothache, sore gums, and mouth ulcers. Some dentists even use them to soothe sensitive teeth nerves.

Here’s how cloves are often used to treat toothache: you put them in your mouth, wet them with your saliva, and then crush them with your molars to get the pain-relieving oil out.

After that, you hold them against the tooth that’s causing you pain for a few minutes and repeat the process until the pain is relieved.

Or, you can just walk the easier road and drink some clove tea. It won’t have the same potent effect, but it may relieve your pain long enough until you can visit a dentist.

May Combat Cancer Cells

May Combat Cancer Cells

Many studies and lab tests suggest that the eugenol in clove may help combat cancer cells, but the studies were mostly done on clove oil since it’s a concentrated dose.

The research isn’t conclusive, though. It suggests that clove can combat breast cancer cells, but it hasn’t been tested on other types.

More importantly, the tests have been done using large amounts of eugenol, which is toxic in high concentrations.

So, as far as science goes, clove tea may help combat cancer cells, but further research is needed to determine the extent of the effects and the amounts needed to yield those effects.

Improves Blood Circulation

Improves Blood Circulation

Cloves are known for their effects on encouraging blood flow, which improves the overall circulation in your body.

Those effects promote the transportation of nutrients and oxygen to all your vital organs, keeping your body’s performance at its best.

Healthy blood circulation reflects on most body functions. It’ll keep your skin looking shiny and your cholesterol levels in check.

May Promote a Healthy Liver

One study on animals showed that clove extract may help reverse liver damage caused by toxins like thioacetamide.

Like most benefits associated with clove tea, eugenol is behind this one as well.

It’s been shown to have potential for treating some liver conditions, but further research is still needed to verify that.

May Treat Stomach Ulcers

May Treat Stomach Ulcers

Stomach ulcers are those painful sores that form on the lining of the esophagus and stomach.

They’re otherwise known as peptic ulcers, and they cause plenty of side effects, like nausea, indigestion, and weight loss.

Doctors mostly treat the cause behind those ulcers to get rid of them, which often involves antibiotics or similar courses of treatment.

A lot of studies have been carried out to study the effects of eugenol on chronic gastric ulcers, and one study done on rats confirmed that it may actually be useful.

The study found that controlled doses of eugenol can indeed help in the treatment of stomach ulcers.

However, it also found that high doses of the compound can actually worsen the irritation and cause other issues. Different research suggests that cloves may help combat H. Pylori, a bacteria that’s notorious for causing stomach issues and in some severe cases, cancer.

May Help With Diabetes

May Help With Diabetes

Studies have shown that cloves may potentially help treat diabetes or at least reduce its risks. One study, in particular, was done on mice to study the effects of these tiny buds on insulin resistance, and the results were promising.

According to the study’s output, a component of clove extract called nigericin can help reduce insulin resistance in the muscle cells.

Rats that consumed it in the study showed improvement in glucose tolerance and beta cell function, as well as less insulin resistance.

Though insulin resistance isn’t always the primary cause of diabetes, it disrupts how your body produces insulin and makes it work twice as hard to do so. As a result, it messes with blood sugar levels and may cause type 2 diabetes.

May Improve Respiratory Health

May Improve Respiratory Health

Studies show that the expectorant properties of cloves may improve respiratory health. It doesn’t treat major conditions or anything, but it’ll help you breathe easier if you’re suffering from a nasty cough or throat congestion.

That’s why clove tea can come pretty in handy for people with asthma or common colds and coughs. One cup is enough to clear your airways and alleviate pressure.

The spicy taste also helps soothe sore throats and reduce the intensity of coughs. Aside from drinking the tea, you can add clove essential oil to your air-freshening routine.

It has the same effects, and it’ll leave your house smelling warm and comforting.

May Prevent the Growth of Bateria

May Prevent the Growth of Bateria

One thing you should know about cloves is that they have a solid antibacterial power.

In other words, consuming cloves or clove tea can prevent the growth of bacteria and microorganisms in your body.

In fact, some specific studies showed that clove can eradicate three well-known bacterial strains, one of which is E. coli, mostly known for causing stomach issues and food poisoning.

Those antibacterial properties are the reason clove is used in plenty of oral health products. The compounds found in cloves are proven to prevent the growth of bacteria that cause gum diseases and irritation.

So, studies show that regularly using clove can help you maintain good oral health and see improvements in oral plaque.

May Improve Bone Health

May Improve Bone Health

Some studies carried out on animals suggest that eugenol, the major component in cloves, may actually help improve bone health by increasing bone mass.

Low bone mass is a majorly common problem in the US, and it often leads to osteoporosis.

Aside from the effects of eugenol, cloves also contain manganese, which helps the body form bones and connective tissues. It also encourages calcium absorption, which leads to a healthy set of bones.

Despite all that, further research is needed to assess how clove can improve bone health. Chances are, it’ll need to be in high dosages to make a notable effect.

Helps Relieve Pain

Helps Relieve Pain

If you’re feeling uncomfortable due to a pounding headache or muscle soreness that won’t go away, a cup of clove tea may help ease the pain and make you feel more comfortable.

Since clove has anti-inflammatory properties, it can soothe pain and help you feel relieved.

Potential Risks of Clove Tea

Potential Risks of Clove Tea

Though clove tea is packed with various health benefits, it doesn’t come free of risks. You may want to be mindful of your consumption if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, or taking blood thinners.

Here’s a roundup of its potential risks.

Toxicity in Some Cases

Toxicity in Some Cases

Though clove tea on its own isn’t toxic, clove oil may be toxic in some cases because of its high concentrations.

Children who consume it even in small amounts are at risk of seizures and liver complications. The same goes for clove products with high concentrations of eugenol.

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

The eugenol in cloves is known for its ability to lower blood sugar levels, so consuming it excessively may cause hypoglycemia.

Hypoglycemia occurs when the blood sugar level in your body falls below the standard range. It often happens due to taking too much insulin or not eating enough food to give your body the energy it needs.

Diabetes patients are more prone to hypoglycemia, so you’ll want to take care of the amount of clove tea you’re consuming if you’re undergoing treatment.

Drug Interactions

Drug Interactions

The eugenol in clove tea interacts with a lot of drugs, so you’ll want to be mindful of any medications you’re taking if you want to drink clove tea regularly.

For one, it interacts with blood thinners and affects the body’s ability to clot blood, so you’ll want to consult your doctor before drinking clove tea if you’re on a daily blood thinner.

The same goes if you have a bleeding disorder because it may hinder your body’s ability to stop bleeding.

Allergic Reactions

Allergic Reactions

Though not as common as other allergies, some people are allergic to eugenol when used topically to treat sore gums or teeth.

The symptoms of this allergy can vary from mild to severe. In most cases, it appears in the form of redness and irritation when applied to the gums.

Meanwhile, some people may suffer from a rash, but that’s highly uncommon.

Is Clove Tea in Pregnancy Good For You?

Is Clove Tea in Pregnancy Good For You?

There’s no evidence that clove tea is harmful to pregnant women, so it should be okay to consume.

However, there’s also not enough information to say that it’s entirely safe, so it’s better to stick to moderate amounts.

Clove is mostly used in food in small amounts, so it shouldn’t be a problem.

However, when it comes to clove tea, it’s better to consult your doctor first and drink it in moderate amounts because it may lower blood sugar levels. The same goes if you’re breastfeeding.

How to Make Clove Tea at Home: A Simple Guide

How to Make Clove Tea at Home: A Simple Guide

Clove tea is the ultimate comfort drink that you can enjoy at any time of the day. The best part? It’s pretty easy to make if you have whole cloves at home. Here’s how to make it.

Ingredients and Equipment

Here’s everything you’ll need to make clove tea:

  • Some boiled water
  • A pot
  • A mesh strainer
  • A spice grinder
  • Whole cloves

Preparation Steps

Once you have everything ready, follow these steps to make your clove tea:

  1. Start by putting a tablespoon of whole cloves in the spice grinder and grind them until they’re coarse. If you don’t have a spice grinder, you can use a mortar and pestle instead.
  2. Fill your pot with water according to the amount you want to make and boil it.
  3. When the water boils, turn off the heat and add the ground cloves.
  4. Let the tea steep for 20 minutes, then strain it and pour it into a cup for serving. You can drink the tea hot or cold, and you can reheat it and drink it the next day.

How to Make Clove Tea With Whole Cloves

How to Make Clove Tea With Whole Cloves

If you don’t want to grind the cloves, you can make your tea using whole cloves instead. Here’s how to do it:

  1. Boil some water in your pot. When it boils, add some whole cloves, depending on how spicy you want your tea to taste.
  2. Lower the heat and let the water boil gently for five to seven minutes.
  3. Turn the heat off and strain the tea to remove the whole cloves.
  4. Pour it into a cup and serve it. You can add some honey or sugar if you prefer your tea sweet.

Tips for Drinking and Serving Clove Tea

Tips for Drinking and Serving Clove Tea

If you want to get the most out of your clove tea, there are some tips you can follow:

  1. Add some cinnamon: Cinnamon and clove are two spices that complement each other pretty well because they’re both a blend of sweet and spicy. If you love cinnamon, you can combine it with the cloves in boiling water and enjoy a spicy cup of tea.
  2. Combine it with rosemary: Rosemary tea tastes a bit minty, close to the taste of lemon. It balances out the spicy taste of clove tea, so you can make them both in one cup. To do so, add some rosemary with the cloves to the boiling water. You can sweeten the tea using a teaspoon of honey.
  3. Add a squeeze of lemon: The acidic taste of lemon can balance out the spice level of clove tea, giving it a bitter yet good taste. If you normally drink your black tea with a squeeze of lemon, you can do the same with your clove tea.
  4. Add some honey: Most people drink their tea sweetened, but in the case of clove tea, honey is a better sweetener than sugar because it compliments the earthy flavor of cloves. You can add a teaspoon of honey to your cup of clove tea for the best flavor.

Final Thoughts

Final Thoughts

As you can see, there are plenty of clove tea benefits that you can enjoy if you add the warm beverage to your routine. Its anti-inflammatory properties make it an excellent pain reliever.

If you’re suffering from a nagging toothache or sore gums, a warm cup of clove tea may help ease the pain.

Likewise, clove tea may ease a nasty cough or relieve the symptoms of a bad cold.

You might also be interested in...
0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this.
Loading...

Related Posts

Similar Articles